What Is the Federal Debt Ceiling and How Is It Used by Politicians?

What is the federal debt ceiling?  In short, it’s “a number over which the nation’s debt is not allowed to reach” (Conrad 2016).  What’s troubling, however, is that the need to raise the debt ceiling implies that the debt has already accumulated, in which case if the ceiling is not raised then America will be … Continue reading What Is the Federal Debt Ceiling and How Is It Used by Politicians?

A Gay President is Off the Table…for Now

In the past few days we've seen Democratic presidential candidates dropping off one-by-one as they secede from the race. Buttigieg seceded on March 1, taking what could have been an historical event in American history off the table -- namely, the first gay president. Whether or not his election to office was likely is beside … Continue reading A Gay President is Off the Table…for Now

What Mises, Hazlitt, and Sowell Have to Say About Sanders’s National Rent Control

On the Bernie Sanders website, the following is listed under the section for Housing for All: Key Points End the housing crisis by investing $2.5 trillion to build nearly 10 million permanently affordable housing units.Protect tenants by implementing a national rent control standard, a “just-cause” requirement for evictions, and ensuring the right to counsel in … Continue reading What Mises, Hazlitt, and Sowell Have to Say About Sanders’s National Rent Control

The ‘Two Constitutional Presidencies’ and Woodrow Wilson’s Influence

Jeffrey Tulis, in "The Two Constitutional Presidencies," argues that there is a formal presidency and an informal presidency.  As a result, he states, "many of the dilemmas and frustrations of the modern presidency may be traced to the president's ambiguous constitutional station, a vantage place composed of conflicting elements."  What follows is an exploration of … Continue reading The ‘Two Constitutional Presidencies’ and Woodrow Wilson’s Influence

“Who Invented the Trinity?”: A Clarification and Defense of the Triune Nature of God Against Islamic Misrepresentation

Introduction In this lengthy post I respond to an article found on the Institute of Islamic Information & Education (III&E) website,1 entitled “Who Invented the Trinity?” (by Aisha Brown).2 I include the article in full (in block quotes and bold font) in this post, with my response interspersed throughout.3 I have seen this article by … Continue reading “Who Invented the Trinity?”: A Clarification and Defense of the Triune Nature of God Against Islamic Misrepresentation

A Concise Theology of Government: Its Institution, Purpose & Law

What follows is by no means an exhaustive treatment of a political philosophy of government, nor does it contain a comparative approach to government.  Instead, what follows is the laying of a foundation and framework for the guidance of further study and structure of thought.  The content of this article is structured on Romans 13:1-10, … Continue reading A Concise Theology of Government: Its Institution, Purpose & Law

By What Standard?: How the Spirit of the Age Made Its Way into the SBC

Earlier this month, the Founders Ministries, a ministry within the Southern Baptist Convention, released a cinedoc titled "By What Standard? God's World...God's Rules". This documentary, produced by David Shannon (aka. "Chocolate Knox") and essentially hosted by Tom Ascol, takes you on a tour of recent politically-driven events plaguing the SBC. At the root of this … Continue reading By What Standard?: How the Spirit of the Age Made Its Way into the SBC

How to Go About Reading in a New Subject Area

Which books should I read first?  If you’ve ever found yourself wanting to study a particular subject (e.g. theology, philosophy, politics, science, data analytics), whether it was for preparation for school or a new/hopeful job or just a hobby, you’ve likely asked yourself that question.  Where to begin?  As King Solomon once said, “the writing … Continue reading How to Go About Reading in a New Subject Area