Will Unipolarity in the International System Give Way to Multipolarity?: A Brief Consideration

Will unipolarity give way to multipolarity?  To state my answer up front, yes, I believe it will.  The question is, how soon…or how long?  Nations rise and fall; governmental structures and those who make up those governments, to include their policies and personal interests, change.  Sometimes this is for the good, sometimes for the bad.  … Continue reading Will Unipolarity in the International System Give Way to Multipolarity?: A Brief Consideration

Just War in the Christian Tradition: A Literature Review

The origin of the just war tradition is rooted in Augustine (AD 354-430), moves into the medieval period with the Catholic monks Gratian (“the father of canon law”) and Thomas Aquinas, then into the Reformation period with the stalwart reformers, Martin Luther and John Calvin.  Luther was the first major figure in the just war … Continue reading Just War in the Christian Tradition: A Literature Review

The Administrative State & Its Discontents

A paper in fulfillment of The U.S. Presidency, Congress & Bureaucracy at American Public University as part of the Master's in Political Science (Public Policy). Abstract American constitutional government has long been threatened by an ever-expanding federal bureaucracy known as the administrative state.  This paper addresses the historical and ideological roots of the administrative state, … Continue reading The Administrative State & Its Discontents

What Is the Federal Debt Ceiling and How Is It Used by Politicians?

What is the federal debt ceiling?  In short, it’s “a number over which the nation’s debt is not allowed to reach” (Conrad 2016).  What’s troubling, however, is that the need to raise the debt ceiling implies that the debt has already accumulated, in which case if the ceiling is not raised then America will be … Continue reading What Is the Federal Debt Ceiling and How Is It Used by Politicians?